Good & Bad News – March 2017

Here’s a collection of some of recent good and bad news about climate change that Al Slavin has compiled from around the web. Some bad news While some technological and political progress is being made to slow the rise in greenhouse-gas emissions, almost all the climate science news is bad, showing an accelerating problem that …

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A one-line blog that says it all!

We have to thank the Edmonton Journal for the ultimate description of Canada’s record in cutting GHG emissions: “Though our icefields are melting fast, our action on climate change has been glacial.”   If you want to see what this glacier looked like 90 years ago, click to see this Edmonton Journal commentary and photo.

Another Denialist Argument “Collapses”

In recent years there has been a controversy over the shrinking Arctic ice cover. Besides disputing the extent and the significance of the loss of ice, Denialists “refuted” scientific observations by referring to the Antarctic.  In parts of the Antarctic ice cover was increasing, which was enough to provide talking points to Denialists who did not consider the whole picture.

Yesterday scientists reported that the collapse of large parts of the ice sheet in Western Antarctica appears to have begun.  The collapse, which appears to be irreversible, will cause a sea level rise of such magnitude that many of the world’s coastal cities would eventually have to be abandoned.

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Entering a New World

This month’s feature is an adapted excerpt from Chapter 1 of Lester R. Brown’s “Entering a New World, Plan B 3.0: Mobilizing to Save Civilization”.  The full text is available for free downloading or purchase here.

More information about the highly influential author is available here.

Nearly all of the 80 million people being added to world population each year are born in countries where natural support systems are already deteriorating in the face of excessive population pressure, in the countries least able to support them. In these countries, the risk of state failure is growing.

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