Climate Commissioner highlights Canada’s failings

At the beginning of the year 4RG met with Chaun Chen, M.P. for Scarborough East to review issues relating to climate change. We discussed the failure of successive Canadian Governments to eliminate subsidies of fossil fuels. Chen wrote us advising that the Liberal Government would: “ . . . direct the Department of Finance to …

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Climate Change and Federal Budgets

Canada’s fossil fuel industry exports much of its output to the US.  As the Trump administration intends to relax environmental laws and eliminate provisions requiring reduced GHG emissions, the US industry will enjoy a favourable legislative and regulatory climate over the next four years -to the possible disadvantage of Canada’s exports. In our January discussions …

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Subsidies to the Fossil Fuel Industry – on the way out!

In 2010 the G-20 countries concluded that financial assistance by a state to its fossil fuel industry encouraged development of fossil fuel resources, leading to increased emissions from fossil fuels. These countries agreed that state assistance, whether in the form of a subsidy or tax incentives, should be phased out over time. EnviroEconomics Inc., a …

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Notre lettre à Ministre Laurent Fabius

Monsieur Laurent Fabius, Ministre des Affaires Etrangères et Président de COP 21 Quay d’Orsay, 75007 Paris France Monsieur le Ministre, For Our Grandchildren (4RG) est un organisme environnemental basé au Canada avec un seul objectif: le changement climatique. Nous avons été critique de la participation du Canada à la Conférence des réunions des Parties au cours …

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Writing on the Wall: the IPCC Fifth Assessment (mitigation)

The most important statement in the recently released IPCC Report from Working Group III on mitigation is the affirmation that disastrous effects of global warming can still be avoided.

In practical terms avoidance of disastrous climate change requires international agreement on a price for carbon. The price must reflect the emerging scarcity of disposal space for carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere.

With a price on carbon, fossil fuels will lose their competitive edge over renewable sources of energy. Canada and certain other countries will find that dependence on fossil fuels for energy cannot be sustained.

There is another consequence for Canada in the displacement of fossil fuels as a source of energy. In future Canada’s fossil fuel resource industry will progressively contribute less and less to our economy.

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