A book that may change everything

This Changes Everything:  Capitalism v. the Climate is a book which we all need to read at least once. Read it I implore you! The book is an intimate chat with Naomi Klein discussing virtually every aspect of climate change/disruption, but first, a quote from Journey of the Universe by Brian Swimme and Mary Evelyn Tucker: …

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More Bang for our Buck

This summer I had a thoroughly pleasant morning with an old friend at the Fredericton Saturday farmers’ market. Steve stopped to chat with friends wherever he turned, we bought provisions, and I bought a few gifts for my family. I was intrigued by the number of people wearing yellow t-shirts with the logo you see at …

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“International Coalition of Grandparents Appeal for Climate Sanity”

Statement to national and international political leaders from Concerned Grandparents – united for our grandchildrens’ sustainable future. International Grandparents call for a new moral leadership, giving priority to the safety of all our grandchildren and their right to a sustainable planet. Putting their best interest at the top of national and international political agendas will …

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Our Honourary Member, Bishop Desmond Tutu, speaks out!

Nearly two years ago Bishop Desmond Tutu agreed to join 4RG as an Honourary Member of our Steering Committee.  Just prior to this, Bishop Tutu and other South African leaders tried to sway the Canadian Government from withdrawing from the Kyoto Convention on climate change.

In asking for our continued support for Kyoto, these South Africans referred to the leadership that Canada had demonstrated in the fight against Apartheid.   They appealed to Canada to show a similar commitment to moral principles in making the tough political decisions about climate change.

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Are the tar sands ecocide?

For six decades Canadians regarded the tar sands as a natural resource to be developed.  The site of the tar sands, located in Canada’s Northern boreal forest, was very sparsely populated, mainly by aboriginal peoples. Apart from sporadic mine sites, there was no other large economic activity carried on until tar sands development arrived in the early 60’s.

Initially no one recognized the risks that could result from the development of the tar sands.  Certainly the extraction of the bitumen from the tar sands would destroy trees and the landscape, but this destruction could later be remedied over time by restoration of the forest.  It was assumed that the toxic substances released by extraction and processing would be in minimal quantities, and so absorbed in the vast space until nature had rendered them harmless. If by chance health consequences did arise, the long-suffering aboriginal peoples would be unlikely to complain until the tar sands reached the status of national resource. The generation of CO2 emissions was not foreseen as a risk until the development was well underway.

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