A clear book on a Difficult Subject

Arguments  against Global Warming  are made by a wide spectrum of critics from Skeptics to Denialists.  There are probably fewer Skeptics than Denialists, but they have a greater influence on public opinion as they present their skepticism in reasonable scientific terms.   Denialists are strident, self-interested and unconcerned by obvious errors in their conclusions. . I … Read more

A School Board acts to educate its students on climate change!

The Portland (Oregon)  School Board recently decided that some educational material used in their Schools was misleading as it implied that climate change was not taking place and in any event human activity was not a cause.   The Board passed a resolution directing school staff to implement a curriculum to address “climate change and climate justice.” To … Read more

Our Choice: The Unavoidable or the Inescapable

A Monday Globe & Mail headline referred to proposals of the Ontario Government to reduce GHG emissions as a “Sea Change”. Yes, these proposals will have quite an impact on Ontario residents.  And they are unavoidable !! . . .   if Ontario is going to play its part in contributing to Canada’s emission targets. Don’t be … Read more

Climate Change Competition: a vision of a post carbon world.

For Our Grandchildren and Earth Day Canada are asking students to work in groups to articulate a vision of their future in a post carbon world. Imagine – the date is 2050 and it is an average day in the life of you, now a group of middle-aged people.  What does this day look since … Read more

Peter Jones reports in from New York

We (Anthony and Mary Ketchum and Marg Anne and I) met with the representatives of the Norwegian Grandparents Climate Campaign at supper tonight.  James Hansen attended and spoke of the need for citizens to march in the streets in large numbers.  In his view without  demonstrations of that size and nature politicians will not recognize … Read more

Why are we marching in New York?

Why? Because our grandchildren’s future is at stake and thousands of people from all over North America are sending a message to world leaders. At least five chartered buses are travelling  from Toronto alone. The March starts at Central Park and world leaders in the General Assembly of the nearby United Nations headquarters will, we hope, take note of this outpouring over the climate crisis. We know that Secretary General Ban Ki-moon will urge leaders to take greater action than we did to defeat the Nazis in World War II.

We will be joined in New York by James Hansen, former head of NASA’s Goddard Institute, and author of Storms of My Grandchildren, along with a dozen of our grandparent friends from Norway. Bill McKibben, who started  <350.org>  (the organizers of the march) and James Hansen have been champions of the battle to bring about clean energy. And battle it has been. The Bush Administration even cut out parts of Hansen’s early report before releasing it !

Nonetheless, like other grandparents, my wife and I are looking forward to a positive future for all grandchildren. And the march on Sept. 21st could be the start of a quiet revolution as all of us begin to comprehend what the space travellers have told us for years: there is only one fragile, jewel of a planet and we have the responsibility to care for it, not poison it or exploit it.

Read moreWhy are we marching in New York?